October 1, 2022
  • October 1, 2022
  • Home
  • Shaft
  • BOB MAINDELLE: Replacement or upgrade of MAL Lure hooks | outdoor sports

BOB MAINDELLE: Replacement or upgrade of MAL Lure hooks | outdoor sports

By on August 7, 2022 0

The MAL lure was first publicly introduced in the summer of 2020. This heavy, shad-mimicking line spinner is effective any time the water temperature exceeds 58 degrees.

The lure was designed to fill in the gaps of other commonly used temperate bass lures (such as slabs, bladebaits, tailspinners and swimbaits), especially during the summer months.

Many anglers who started using the MAL lure early on, as well as those who use their MAL lures frequently, find that, like all moving parts, hooks eventually wear out, dull, bend, rust or break.

As I have spoken with MAL Lure users at the lake, on the phone, or through messages on the Texas Fishing Forum, I have found that premature hook failure or hook damage is often caused when removing the hook from a fish’s mouth.

Although I’ve mentioned it several times in this column, it bears repeating that the best tool I’ve found to remove the MAL lure treble hook from a fish’s mouth is a pair of hemostats. six inch long curved tip (some call these forceps). These are usually available at army surplus stores and auto parts stores, as well as online.

Hemostats are far superior to needle nose forceps in that the jaws are much thinner in diameter and the offset of the curved jaws prevents your own hand and the tool itself from obstructing your view of the hook than you are trying to type. and delete.

Whichever tool you choose to use, hooks will eventually need to be replaced. My aim is to provide advice here on replacing MAL Lure hooks. Here is a set of step-by-step instructions:

Step 1: Cut the old treble hook using a pair of diagonal wire cutters (aka dams) or a rotary tool (i.e. Dremel) with a cutting wheel to cut the eye of the hook. old treble hook. Do not cut the wire loop of the

MAL Lure wire tree as it will ruin the lure. Wear eye protection, as a piece of the old hook may fly through the air.

Once the cut is made, you may need to grab the eyelet of the hook and twist it a bit so it splays enough to pull it out of the spinner’s metal loop.

2nd step: Remove and set aside the small piece of plastic tubing from the old treble; you will use it later.

Step 3: Slide the saved piece of tubing onto the shank of your new treble hook. This tube prevents “blade strikes”, so be sure to reuse it. Since the recommended replacement treble hook is a little shorter than the original, you may need to cut the length of the tube a bit so that it doesn’t interfere with the treble swinging freely from the split ring .

Step 4: Using a pair of split ring pliers, pull apart a split ring and slide both the yarn loop from the spinner and the new treble hook over the split ring. Continue sliding them in the same direction until the split ring securely connects the new hook to the spinner’s thread shaft.

When thinking about which hook to use to replace the original, there are a bewildering number of brands and styles to choose from.

I’ve tried to keep things simple by offering pre-made replacement hooks available in packs of four. These come with new tubes already fitted and an appropriately sized split ring already attached so it is ready to be placed on the lure you wish to fix.

Anglers can go to www.WhiteBassTools.com and find these suitably sized hook sets there.

For those using the MAL lure primarily for white bass, the size four replacement hooks are most suitable. Five styles, which can be “mixed and matched”, can be found on the website. There is 1) a treble that exactly matches the original hook, 2) a short shank hook designed to allow for the small amount of extra length added by the split ring that is needed to connect the replacement hook to the lure, 3) a 4X strong hook, 4) a 6X strong hook, and 5) a barbless hook that exactly matches the hook found on the barbless versions of the MAL lure.

I suggest using the short shank hook option.

For those using the MAL lure primarily for hybrid stripers and striped bass, size two replacement hooks are most suitable. Three styles, which can be “mixed and matched”, on the website. There is 1) a treble that exactly matches the original hook, 2) a short shank hook designed to allow for the small amount of extra length added by the split ring that is needed to connect the replacement hook to the lure, and 3) a solid 4X hook.

Again, I suggest using the short shank hook option.

Website limits show that all four packs consist of one of the sizes and styles of hooks above.

If you call or text me at 254-368-7411, I’ll mix and match any way you want.

If you’re more of a do-it-yourselfer, I still encourage you to visit the website listed above, as I list all the part numbers you’ll want to use when ordering your own hooks and split rings from a seller of your choice.

One final note – when handling your lure to replace the hook, don’t overlook the spinner shaft. It should be as straight as possible to allow the spinner to spin as freely as intended. This swirling spinner blade provides much of the lure’s attraction. So if you see the shaft is bent, just use light hand pressure (no tools that can bend the shaft) to straighten it.

We’re all cutting corners these days, it seems. If you can fix an $8 lure with a $1.25 hook, tube, and split ring set, you’ve saved enough for about two gallons of gas.

  Shaft