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“Saforiza Nuclear Power Plant, Temporary Suspension of External Power” – The Organization for World Peace

By on September 22, 2022 0

As a series of bombings at Russia’s Japoriza nuclear power plant in Ukraine raised fears of a security mishap, Ukrainian authorities began distributing emergency iodine tablets to nearby residents in case of a possible radioactive leak. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) rushes to inspect the site. Suppose potassium iodide, a stable substance, is taken in advance. In this case, it first locates in the thyroid tissue and prevents radioactive iodine from accumulating in the body when subsequently exposed to radioactive substances.

According to the Associated Press and The New York Times on the 27th, Ukrainian authorities began distributing iodine to residents living within a radius of 56 km around the Zaporizhia nuclear power plant from the previous day. Ukrainian Health Minister Viktor Riasico said: “The government does not have to buy as much as the capacity recommended by experts and live separately. The NYT estimated that about 400,000 nearby residents would be at risk if radioactive material leaked from the Japoriza nuclear power plant.

Fighting continued this month in and around the Zaporizhia nuclear power plant, occupied by Russian troops in March. The Associated Press reported that fears of a radioactive disaster are growing in Ukraine, where memories of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986 linger. There are also fears that if Europe’s largest nuclear power plant in Zaporizhia explodes, the damage are ten times greater than those of the Chernobyl disaster.

On the 25th, two of the six reactors at the Japoriza nuclear power plant were temporarily shut down. A fire broke out near the nuclear plant, destroying the power lines that supply the nuclear plant. There were no accidents due to emergency power operation. Yet, if the power outage continued for more than 90 minutes, the cooling system could have shut down and caused a “core meltdown”, during which the center of the reactor would have melted. Paralysis of the cooling system also caused the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011 when the tsunami cut off electricity.

Ukraine and Russia also engaged in battle on the 27th, claiming their adversaries had bombed near the Zaporizhia nuclear power plant. Ukrainian state-owned company Energoatom, in charge of operating the nuclear power plant, said: “The Russian army has repeatedly bombed the site of the nuclear power plant in the past 24 hours, causing damage to infrastructure and a risk of leakage of radioactive materials”. On the other hand, the Russian Ministry of National Defense claimed that “Ukrainian forces shelled the site three times in the last 24 hours”. He said: “Radiation levels at the Zaporizhia nuclear power plant are normal.”

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky urged the IAEA to surrender early on the 26th, saying: “The situation at the Zaporizhia nuclear power plant is still dangerous. The day before, US President Joe Biden spoke with Zelensky and said, “Russia should return control of the Zaporizhia nuclear power plant to Ukraine and allow IAEA inspections as soon as possible.”

The Wall Street Journal reported that the external power supply to the Russian-occupied Zaporizhia nuclear power plant was temporarily suspended after the IAEA reported: “The IAEA inspection team is due to visit at the start of the next week. Concerns about an atomic disaster are growing after Ukraine announced the suspension of all power supplies to the Japoriza nuclear power plant.

According to Reuters on the 3rd (local time), the IAEA said on its official website that IAEA experts currently residing at the Japoriza nuclear power plant recently heard from Ukrainian employees that the external power line was briefly disconnected. However, the IAEA said it learned that the Japoriza nuclear power plant was immediately supplied with electricity by auxiliary power lines connected to nearby thermal power plants and could receive preliminary electricity if necessary.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said the external power supply to the Russian-occupied Zaporizhia nuclear power plant that invaded Ukraine has been temporarily suspended. Concerns about an atomic disaster are growing after Ukraine announced it would shut down all power supplies to the Japoriza nuclear power plant.

According to Reuters on the 3rd (local time), the IAEA said on its official website that IAEA experts currently residing at the Japoriza nuclear power plant recently heard from Ukrainian employees that the external power line was briefly disconnected. However, the IAEA said it learned that the Japoriza nuclear power plant was immediately supplied with electricity by auxiliary power lines connected to nearby thermal power plants and could receive preliminary electricity if necessary.

The Russian military also claims that Ukrainian troops were hit by the bombing of the Zaporizhia nuclear power plant. The Russian Ministry of National Defense said: “250 Ukrainian Navy soldiers tried to cross the lake near the Zaporizhia nuclear power plant at around 11 p.m. on the 2nd, but (we) stopped it.” Previously, Ukraine claimed that all power supplies to the Japorija nuclear power plant had been cut off due to Russian artillery fire. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky claimed on the 25th of last month that the attack by the Russian army had damaged the transmission line, causing the Zaporizhia nuclear power plant to shut down for the first time in history. Three of the four transmission lines that supplied electricity to the Japoriza nuclear power plant were damaged at the start of the war. Even one was destroyed by Russian artillery fire and the backup power was activated.

When the power supply to the nuclear power plant is cut off, the system that cools the reactor heated by nuclear fission is paralyzed. This leads to the “meltdown” of the reactor, which increases the risk of radiation leakage. In response, IAEA Secretary General Rafael Mariano Grossi visited the Japoriza nuclear power plant on the 3rd with 13 experts, and six experts conducted inspections there until the weekend. Two of them will remain in the country indefinitely. The IAEA will report the results of the inspectors’ security checks to the United Nations.